Review:Toronto:Downtown:Sansotei Ramen

I dropped into this Ramen house around 11 am on a Tuesday morning, taking advantage of the fact that there wasn’t a crowd huddled around the door like you’d see during a Sylvester Stallone sighting.  The reasons for the mass crowds are threefold:

1.  It’s ramen and it’s Toronto.

2.  The place only holds about 30 people.

3.  The policy is wait outside because there’s no room inside.

The decor is plain.  The tables are bare.  The menu is a small laminated, folded card.  The tiny kitchen is barely visible in the back. No cliffhanger here…I followed my standard routine and ordered shio ramen with a side of gyoza dumplings.

The Ramen

It was quite a simple presentation, including green onion, noodles, a few bamboo shoots, pork belly and a softish boiled egg. It ignored the bells and whistles such as nori, pickled plums and goji berries. The broth was rich and full of pork flavor.  On one hand, it was not oversalted. On the other, it was a bit greasy which wasn’t  helped by the really fatty pork cut submerged in the broth.  The egg was cooked and seasoned well, the amount of onion and shoots were not enough and the noodles (ordered thick) were a bit starchy. In the end, it was a decent bowl and less than $9.

Shio Ramen
Shio Ramen

The Gyoza

The lipophilic  nature of Sansotei was evident again when I ordered the gyoza.  Four pieces  for $4.50 (I ate one before I remembered I didn’t take a picture) arrived Stallone style (slightly tanned and glistening with oil) and served with a tasty dipping sauce.   Despite being a bit greasy, the dough had a great texture (unlike Stallone  post Judge Dredd) in that it was not too chewy nor too crispy.  The filling was well seasoned and not watered down in a fashion similar to the plot of Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot.

Gyoza
Gyoza

My Take

Sansotei is a small, simple eatery with an equally simple menu.  It doesn’t have the bells and whistles of other ramens, but despite being a bit greasy,  the rich broth is flavorful enough and is not oversalted.  None of the broths are vegetarian. The gyoza were terrific although a quick wipe with a napkin wouldn’t hurt.  I really need to do a ramen power  ranking but as it stands Sansotei comes in Stallone style again (an underdog who  proves to be a serious contender).  In the end, it may not the be the Rocky of all ramen, but it sure isn’t  the Rhinestone  either.

Sansotei Ramen on Urbanspoon

Review:Toronto:Downtown:Santouka Ramen

Toronto is one of a  number of  North American cities in which Santouka Ramen, a Japanese-based restaurant chain, has set up shop in hopes of capturing the growing base of noodle fans.  Santouka promises quick and efficient service but tries  to deviate from the notion that all ramen soups are created equal.  It steers away from rich pork belly, eggs and nori offered by others in lieu of  a somewhat cleaner bowl of salty broth.  I arrived at 1210 and got the last seat, which was at the bar with a clear view of the kitchen. I was a bit memorized by the long stove holding up 8 large vats  of bubbling broth presumably prepared by a methodical and somewhat mystical  process. Otherwise, it had the feel of a karaoke bar set up in a subway station, with orders sung in Japanese melodies muffling the continuous sound of clanking soup bowls. I had my meal and was out in about  30 minutes, receiving  envious stares from the 12-15 onlookers in line when I left.

Maybe

It’s apparent that each interpretation of this traditional dish is in the eye of the beholder.   In this case, the Shio Ramen  was a mellow, salty broth with a firm, tasty noodle and adorned with green onion, crisp bamboo shoots, fish cake, ribbons of kikurage (mushrooms), fatty back rib pork and a signature pickled plum.  If I were a soup architect constructing the perfect bowl, I’d say the foundation (broth) was a bit oversalted, the walls (noodles)  were solid and the accents spiced up the decor reasonably well. Both the plum and the spiral fishcake were a cute finish; a delicate  reminder of the artistic importance put on  Japanese food.  The shoots and shrooms were mainly for taste and texture and somewhat succeeded at both but more so the latter.  The pork was scarce. Perhaps my biggest disappointment was the lack of an egg.  It’s like building  a house without a pool; it works but you’re left feeling like there’s something missing.

Shio Ramen
Shio Ramen

The gyoza were satisfying. Not doughy or soggy,  they had a nicely seasoned and fairly abundant filling and were served with a carousel of condiments which included chili oil, rice vinegar and soy sauce. At a little more than a buck a dumpling, they hit the spot.  I would equate them to a nicely manicured but not spectacular lawn sitting outside the previously described  ramen house.

Shio Ramen with Gyoza
Shio Ramen with Gyoza
Gyoza Condiments
Gyoza Condiments

Mundane

I find something sacred about green tea and somewhat expect a little ceremony when I visit a Japanese restaurant.  What I don’t expect is a generic tea bag (I think I can get a 100 bags of this brand for a buck or two at any teashop)  in a cup for $2.50.  At least bring me a good quality loose leaf tea and/or put it in a  pot.  Otherwise, don’t charge me a ridiculous price for an average product that maybe costs a cent or two.

My $2.50 tea.
My $2.50 tea.

My Take

Once again, no two soups are created equal.  The seemingly infinite number of ramen houses mean an infinite number of ramen dishes and an infinite number of opinions. Santouka offered a reasonable competitor with a well flavoured but salt heavy broth (I drove home with the feeling that I had a chalice of water from the dead sea).  The pork was a nice cut but the portion was minimal. The remaining additions were just ok.   In summary,  it’s a worthy, well-calculated  addition to the neighbourhood of ramen soups, offering a house with a strong foundation, a few frills and a nice front yard (gyoza), although I still do miss the pool.

Santouka Ramen on Urbanspoon